King Salman inducts high-tech fighter jets into RSAF

Author: 
Arab News
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485377213332741000

RIYADH: King Salman on Wednesday attended the 50th anniversary celebrations of the King Faisal Air Academy (KFAA).
The KFAA also marked the graduation ceremony of its 91st batch of students, as well as the launch of the new F-15SA aircraft, which has joined the fleet of the Royal Saudi Air Force.
The event was held in the presence of Omar Al-Bashir, president of Sudan.
Commander of the Air College, Air Vice Marshal Khalid Al-La’aboun, delivered a speech welcoming King Salman and Al-Bashir.
“Today we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the establishment of this ancient edifice. The beginning of the training was launched by the late King Faisal bin Abdul Aziz, may God have mercy on him, by raising the banner of the college in this field having the honor to carry his name,” he said.
Al-La’aboun pointed out that the college has become one of the best flight schools in the world. Thousands of pilots and technicians who have served their country in various fields, and participated in the protection of its airspace, have graduated from the academy.
King Salman and the audience watched a film to mark the 50th anniversary of the KFAA, which featured the most prominent achievements of the academy.
King Salman also launched the new F-15SA aircraft which recently joined the fleet of the Royal Saudi Air Force. He watched a film about the plane and its advanced technologies, followed by an air parade show.

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4 women among 25 winners of prize for inventors, talented

Author: 
Mohammed Rasooldeen | Arab News Staff
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376948742709400

RIYADH: Four women were among 25 winners of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Prize for inventors and the talented (Takreem), which was distributed by Minister of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources Khalid A. Al-Falih at the headquarters of the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on Wednesday.
The prize was established by ministerial decree to contribute to the development of science and technology in support of the transition to a knowledge-based society; to encourage and appreciate distinguished inventors and the gifted in science, technology and innovation; to develop a spirit of creativity, innovation and invention; and to motivate talents and abilities.
The laureates received cash prizes ranging from SR100,000 ($26,663) to SR200,000 ($53,326) to help them promote their future programs.
Congratulating the winners, the KACST’s president, Prince Dr. Turki bin Saud bin Mohammed, chairman of the council of trustees for the prize, said he hoped it would help them achieve more progress and development to build a knowledge-based society.
The prince told Arab News it is a historic occasion when the prize is given to honor winners who contribute a great deal in their field of research and skills.
He said more than SR3 billion ($800 million) has been spent on 2,000 science and technology projects under the first national plan for science, technology and innovation. “We have planned out several new projects under Vision 2030 and the National Transformation Program (NTP) 2020.”
He added that the prize demonstrates the interest shown by King Salman to encourage and give honor where it is due.
Al-Falih said the intelligentsia is being encouraged by the king at a time when the government is undergoing a transformation period under Vision 2030 and NTP 2020. The Kingdom can use their talents for national prosperity, the minister said.
Secretary general of the awards committee, Dr. Abdulrahman bin Ibrahim, said the committee received 387 nominations in the inventors category and 583 in the gifted category. “We have chosen 17 winners from the first category, while seven were selected for the gifted category,” he said.
The prize for the inventors category was awarded to Dr. Muneer bin Mahmoud Al-Dsouqi, Dr. Ali bin Abdrabb Al-Rasool Al-Hamza, Dr. Fares bin Dabas Al-Sweilem, Dr. Waleed bin Fahd Allafi, Dr. Ali bin Saad Al-Ghamdi, Dr. Abdullah bin Mohammed Asiri, Dr. Basem bin Yousef Sheikh, Dr. Khalid bin Saad Abdukhair, Dr. Majed bin Muaala Al-Hazmi, Dr. Saeed bin Mohammed Al-Zahrani, Dr. Saad bin Abdullah Al-Jalil, Dr. Inas bin Mueen Al-Nashef, Dr. Khadija bint Mohammed Al-Zaydi, Dr. Iman bint Kamel Al-Dagas, Eng. Saleh bin Bidaiwe Al-Ruwaili, Eng. Saeed bin Mahd Al-Mubarak and Mohsen bin Jubran Hussein.

Main category: 

4 women among 25 winners of prize for inventors, talented

Author: 
Mohammed Rasooldeen | Arab News Staff
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376948742709400

RIYADH: Four women were among 25 winners of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Prize for inventors and the talented (Takreem), which was distributed by Minister of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources Khalid A. Al-Falih at the headquarters of the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on Wednesday.
The prize was established by ministerial decree to contribute to the development of science and technology in support of the transition to a knowledge-based society; to encourage and appreciate distinguished inventors and the gifted in science, technology and innovation; to develop a spirit of creativity, innovation and invention; and to motivate talents and abilities.
The laureates received cash prizes ranging from SR100,000 ($26,663) to SR200,000 ($53,326) to help them promote their future programs.
Congratulating the winners, the KACST’s president, Prince Dr. Turki bin Saud bin Mohammed, chairman of the council of trustees for the prize, said he hoped it would help them achieve more progress and development to build a knowledge-based society.
The prince told Arab News it is a historic occasion when the prize is given to honor winners who contribute a great deal in their field of research and skills.
He said more than SR3 billion ($800 million) has been spent on 2,000 science and technology projects under the first national plan for science, technology and innovation. “We have planned out several new projects under Vision 2030 and the National Transformation Program (NTP) 2020.”
He added that the prize demonstrates the interest shown by King Salman to encourage and give honor where it is due.
Al-Falih said the intelligentsia is being encouraged by the king at a time when the government is undergoing a transformation period under Vision 2030 and NTP 2020. The Kingdom can use their talents for national prosperity, the minister said.
Secretary general of the awards committee, Dr. Abdulrahman bin Ibrahim, said the committee received 387 nominations in the inventors category and 583 in the gifted category. “We have chosen 17 winners from the first category, while seven were selected for the gifted category,” he said.
The prize for the inventors category was awarded to Dr. Muneer bin Mahmoud Al-Dsouqi, Dr. Ali bin Abdrabb Al-Rasool Al-Hamza, Dr. Fares bin Dabas Al-Sweilem, Dr. Waleed bin Fahd Allafi, Dr. Ali bin Saad Al-Ghamdi, Dr. Abdullah bin Mohammed Asiri, Dr. Basem bin Yousef Sheikh, Dr. Khalid bin Saad Abdukhair, Dr. Majed bin Muaala Al-Hazmi, Dr. Saeed bin Mohammed Al-Zahrani, Dr. Saad bin Abdullah Al-Jalil, Dr. Inas bin Mueen Al-Nashef, Dr. Khadija bint Mohammed Al-Zaydi, Dr. Iman bint Kamel Al-Dagas, Eng. Saleh bin Bidaiwe Al-Ruwaili, Eng. Saeed bin Mahd Al-Mubarak and Mohsen bin Jubran Hussein.

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Makkah governor receives report on efforts to correct the status of Burmese expats

Author: 
Arab News
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376948722709100

JEDDAH: Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal, adviser to King Salman, received in his office in Jeddah the final report on the work of the standing committee to correct the status of Burmese expats.
The report which Prince Khaled Al-Faisal received from Prince Faisal bin Mohammad, deputy governor for rights affairs and chairman of the standing committee to correct the status of the Burmese, said that more than 190,000 free residence cards, valid for four years, were distributed. The residence permits were issued on sponsorships of companies and institutions and individuals. There were also exemptions from the accumulated fines resulting from non-renewal of residencies for many years because of their inability to renew their passports, or being unable to cancel runaway reports against them.
The report also noted that 7,428 Burmese beneficiaries were referred to the Personal Status Court to prove marriage, parenthood and child support issues.
It further indicated that the Ministry of Labor and Social Development branch in Makkah participated in correcting the status of laborers, including changing the professions, calculating the Burmese worker as only a quarter against the foreign workers in the Nitaqat program, and maintaining Burmese maids on sponsorships of their families. The status changes also included exempting workers from the transfer of their sponsorships to the enterprises where they want to work.
The report also showed that more than 83,000 beneficiaries received vaccinations against tuberculosis, meningitis, seasonal influenza and tetanus at the medical centers at the correction status headquarters. An estimated 750 cases of illnesses were transferred from the emergency medical centers to hospitals in Makkah.
The medical team in charge of work at the correction headquarters received a bus and an ambulance, said the report.
Health Affairs in the region also treated 2,257 cases infected with hepatitis B or C, in addition to other medical conditions at a cost estimated at SR25 million. The total cost of medical treatment and preventive services provided for the Burmese community was estimated at SR782 million.
The report noted the Myanmar community charitable schools’ status in Makkah was corrected, with about 121 schools, and that the students have all been enrolled in the three stages— primary, intermediate and secondary study levels— a total of 62,650 students. It said that university scholarships for outstanding students were also granted to about 1,307 students.
The report reported that free meals were served for a total of 1,500 meals per day throughout the correction period, as well as water supplies, approximately 2,000 water containers daily.
Finally, the report said that free health care services were also provided through the Zamzam Health Services Association and Shifa Association for 11,682 beneficiaries.

Main category: 

Makkah governor receives report on efforts to correct the status of Burmese expats

Author: 
Arab News
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376948722709100

JEDDAH: Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal, adviser to King Salman, received in his office in Jeddah the final report on the work of the standing committee to correct the status of Burmese expats.
The report which Prince Khaled Al-Faisal received from Prince Faisal bin Mohammad, deputy governor for rights affairs and chairman of the standing committee to correct the status of the Burmese, said that more than 190,000 free residence cards, valid for four years, were distributed. The residence permits were issued on sponsorships of companies and institutions and individuals. There were also exemptions from the accumulated fines resulting from non-renewal of residencies for many years because of their inability to renew their passports, or being unable to cancel runaway reports against them.
The report also noted that 7,428 Burmese beneficiaries were referred to the Personal Status Court to prove marriage, parenthood and child support issues.
It further indicated that the Ministry of Labor and Social Development branch in Makkah participated in correcting the status of laborers, including changing the professions, calculating the Burmese worker as only a quarter against the foreign workers in the Nitaqat program, and maintaining Burmese maids on sponsorships of their families. The status changes also included exempting workers from the transfer of their sponsorships to the enterprises where they want to work.
The report also showed that more than 83,000 beneficiaries received vaccinations against tuberculosis, meningitis, seasonal influenza and tetanus at the medical centers at the correction status headquarters. An estimated 750 cases of illnesses were transferred from the emergency medical centers to hospitals in Makkah.
The medical team in charge of work at the correction headquarters received a bus and an ambulance, said the report.
Health Affairs in the region also treated 2,257 cases infected with hepatitis B or C, in addition to other medical conditions at a cost estimated at SR25 million. The total cost of medical treatment and preventive services provided for the Burmese community was estimated at SR782 million.
The report noted the Myanmar community charitable schools’ status in Makkah was corrected, with about 121 schools, and that the students have all been enrolled in the three stages— primary, intermediate and secondary study levels— a total of 62,650 students. It said that university scholarships for outstanding students were also granted to about 1,307 students.
The report reported that free meals were served for a total of 1,500 meals per day throughout the correction period, as well as water supplies, approximately 2,000 water containers daily.
Finally, the report said that free health care services were also provided through the Zamzam Health Services Association and Shifa Association for 11,682 beneficiaries.

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Janadriyah festival opens next Wednesday Egypt guest of honor

Author: 
Rashid Hassan | Arab News Staff
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376948692708800

RIYADH: Egypt will be the guest-of-honor country at Al-Janadriyah 31, the national heritage and culture festival named after the village on the northern outskirts of Riyadh, where it is held annually to celebrate Saudi identity.
The festival, organized by the Ministry of National Guard, will open on Wednesday under the patronage of King Salman, said Abdul Mohsen bin Abdulaziz Al-Tuwaijri, deputy minister of the National Guard and deputy chairman of the festival’s supreme committee, at a press conference.
He said King Salman is a strong believer in the festival’s message of maintaining and deepening Saudi heritage, culture and traditions, and above all the principles of Islam, as was the late King Abdullah.
“In the upcoming 31st session of the festival, we keep progressing under our wise leadership in building our country and protecting our achievements and holy shrines,” Al-Tuwaijri said, expressing pleasure in hosting Egypt as the guest of honor.
He praised media coverage of the festival and the close partnership between the two.
The press conference was attended by Nasser Hamdy, ambassador of Egypt in Riyadh. “It is a great honor for Egypt to have been chosen as the guest-of-honor country for the 31st edition of the festival. We express our sincere thanks to King Salman for choosing us,” Hamdy told Arab News.
“The participation of Egypt at this outstanding cultural heritage festival of course reflects the deep relations beatween the two countries,” he said, adding that this will further strengthen people-to-people relations and cultural exchange.
Egypt’s government is “very dedicated to finalizing all aspects of participation in the festival,” Hamdy said. “Preparation is almost finished. Eleven troops will participate in our special pavilion, representing different parts of Egypt and its diversity.”

Main category: 

Janadriyah festival opens next Wednesday Egypt guest of honor

Author: 
Rashid Hassan | Arab News Staff
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376948692708800

RIYADH: Egypt will be the guest-of-honor country at Al-Janadriyah 31, the national heritage and culture festival named after the village on the northern outskirts of Riyadh, where it is held annually to celebrate Saudi identity.
The festival, organized by the Ministry of National Guard, will open on Wednesday under the patronage of King Salman, said Abdul Mohsen bin Abdulaziz Al-Tuwaijri, deputy minister of the National Guard and deputy chairman of the festival’s supreme committee, at a press conference.
He said King Salman is a strong believer in the festival’s message of maintaining and deepening Saudi heritage, culture and traditions, and above all the principles of Islam, as was the late King Abdullah.
“In the upcoming 31st session of the festival, we keep progressing under our wise leadership in building our country and protecting our achievements and holy shrines,” Al-Tuwaijri said, expressing pleasure in hosting Egypt as the guest of honor.
He praised media coverage of the festival and the close partnership between the two.
The press conference was attended by Nasser Hamdy, ambassador of Egypt in Riyadh. “It is a great honor for Egypt to have been chosen as the guest-of-honor country for the 31st edition of the festival. We express our sincere thanks to King Salman for choosing us,” Hamdy told Arab News.
“The participation of Egypt at this outstanding cultural heritage festival of course reflects the deep relations beatween the two countries,” he said, adding that this will further strengthen people-to-people relations and cultural exchange.
Egypt’s government is “very dedicated to finalizing all aspects of participation in the festival,” Hamdy said. “Preparation is almost finished. Eleven troops will participate in our special pavilion, representing different parts of Egypt and its diversity.”

Main category: 

Ricciardone sees many commonalities between Saudi vision and AUC mission

Author: 
LULWA SHALHOUB
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376433102642400

JEDDAH: The president of the American University in Cairo (AUC), which completes 100 years in 2019, held a series of talks with high-ranking Saudi officials and businesspeople in Riyadh and Jeddah with a view to exploring new avenues of cooperation.
Francis Ricciardone, a former US diplomat and now head of the historic university, says education is “more important than ever.”
Education can make the Middle East a hub for a deep-rooted culture rather than a region of conflict.
After a long diplomatic career that gave him first-hand experience of what it is like to live in the Middle East, he was recently appointed president of the AUC, a 98-year-old Western educational institution in the heart of the Arab world.
“I came to the AUC because I believe that the educational mission is more important than ever,” Ricciardone told Arab News on Tuesday during his visit to Jeddah.
Established in 1919, the AUC is one of the oldest Western universities in the region. “We’re almost 100 years old, and the AUC has always had a mission of service to Egypt and the region” he said.
“This has made it be seen as part of the region, not something foreign. If foreign, then in a good way. If American, then in a way that Arabs value about America: Open, visionary, scientific, leading the way and opening minds for development.”
Ricciardone served as US ambassador to Cairo from 2005-2009, and to Ankara from 2011-2014, in addition to holding other diplomatic roles.
He said he loved the feeling of service and bringing people together, but wanted to try something different.
So he joined the world of think tanks at the Washington-based Atlantic Council, where he did a study with former US diplomats Madeline Albright and Stephen Hadley.
“We came a year ago to Egypt, Tunisia and Jordan, and I came here (Saudi Arabia to discuss) a new American strategy with partners in the region under a new American administration that would take off as we knew in 2017,” Ricciardone said.
Everywhere they went, people emphasized the importance of education. “Education is the way, and the AUC is the vehicle that brings together Arabs and Americans. I wanted to do something catalizing,” he said.
“I didn’t come to Egypt and this region despite the problems. I came because of them, at a time when there are bigots and fanatics, people building walls,” he added.
American education focuses on problem-solving, not simply answering questions. “It’s easy to find the answer to a question. You need to have the ability for critical creative thinking, communicate it in ways that interlock, and complement with people who can fill in the gaps in your knowledge.”

Collaboration with Saudi Arabia
Ricciardone’s visit to Jeddah and Riyadh is the first in his new capacity as AUC president. He is set to run meetings at the Education Ministry to explore the potential of collaborating at an educational level.
The AUC wants to collaborate with Saudi universities as well as lower schools. “The Kingdom has a vision, you have a reformist minister and the resources,” he said.
“Even in a time of budget restraint, the Kingdom is allocating recourses to education. If we can partner, we might be able to do great things together.”
He added: “You have energy now in the Kingdom. It’s remarkable and getting attention. You have energy in the Arab world. There’s a youthful energy here yet to find its expression, in business, art, science, and it’s finding its way. The AUC is part of it.”
He said the institution connects Egypt and the US, and aims to encourage internationals who are afraid of going to Egypt after the revolution to study there. Last year, 52 students from the Gulf enrolled, 21 of them Saudi.
“Historically, we opened the doors to young Egyptians, Palestinians and people from the Gulf,” Ricciardone said.
“We helped open the world to Egyptians and Arabs from the region by teaching in English and applying inquiry-based education and research. We (also) serve as a global university to bring Westerners to the East.
“It’s not always easy, especially now. There are bigots in the West and the East who want to build walls and paint each other as fanatics and murderers. Sadly, they’re having some success and they’re causing fear.”

Cairo then and now
Ricciardone first encountered the AUC as a tourist in 1977. He was a young schoolteacher in Iran. In the 1980s, he came back as a diplomat, met some of the professors and deepened his knowledge of the AUC.
In 2008 there were 681 Americans, accounting for about 15 percent of students. Now there are only 80 Americans.
“The revolution made people afraid to come to Egypt, but I think they’re wrongly afraid. A big part of my challenge as president, and our challenge as a faculty, is to bring back Americans to faculty. We used to have 45 percent American faculty members, now they’re about 30 percent,” he said.
“I want to bring more international students, more Saudis, more from the Gulf, more from Egypt. I want to re-internationalize, re-globalize the AUC.”
He said the US government approving the Fulbright scholarship program and other US study programs would signal to American academia that it is good to go back to Egypt and the Arab world, and “that the Arab world is welcoming” to Americans.
“American globalized audiences are concerned about America’s place in the world, and want to do something about it. The answer is come study and learn the true story about Islam and Muslims. Come learn Arabic in the Middle East, and have Middle Easterners say who they are and what their dreams are for the future,” he said.
“Don’t allow Daesh to hijack the personality and presentation of the Arab world. (They are) criminals. People in the Middle East know it.”
Today, AUC is home to 6,559 students — 95 percent of them Egyptian.

Main category: 

Ricciardone sees many commonalities between Saudi vision and AUC mission

Author: 
LULWA SHALHOUB
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376433102642400

JEDDAH: The president of the American University in Cairo (AUC), which completes 100 years in 2019, held a series of talks with high-ranking Saudi officials and businesspeople in Riyadh and Jeddah with a view to exploring new avenues of cooperation.
Francis Ricciardone, a former US diplomat and now head of the historic university, says education is “more important than ever.”
Education can make the Middle East a hub for a deep-rooted culture rather than a region of conflict.
After a long diplomatic career that gave him first-hand experience of what it is like to live in the Middle East, he was recently appointed president of the AUC, a 98-year-old Western educational institution in the heart of the Arab world.
“I came to the AUC because I believe that the educational mission is more important than ever,” Ricciardone told Arab News on Tuesday during his visit to Jeddah.
Established in 1919, the AUC is one of the oldest Western universities in the region. “We’re almost 100 years old, and the AUC has always had a mission of service to Egypt and the region” he said.
“This has made it be seen as part of the region, not something foreign. If foreign, then in a good way. If American, then in a way that Arabs value about America: Open, visionary, scientific, leading the way and opening minds for development.”
Ricciardone served as US ambassador to Cairo from 2005-2009, and to Ankara from 2011-2014, in addition to holding other diplomatic roles.
He said he loved the feeling of service and bringing people together, but wanted to try something different.
So he joined the world of think tanks at the Washington-based Atlantic Council, where he did a study with former US diplomats Madeline Albright and Stephen Hadley.
“We came a year ago to Egypt, Tunisia and Jordan, and I came here (Saudi Arabia to discuss) a new American strategy with partners in the region under a new American administration that would take off as we knew in 2017,” Ricciardone said.
Everywhere they went, people emphasized the importance of education. “Education is the way, and the AUC is the vehicle that brings together Arabs and Americans. I wanted to do something catalizing,” he said.
“I didn’t come to Egypt and this region despite the problems. I came because of them, at a time when there are bigots and fanatics, people building walls,” he added.
American education focuses on problem-solving, not simply answering questions. “It’s easy to find the answer to a question. You need to have the ability for critical creative thinking, communicate it in ways that interlock, and complement with people who can fill in the gaps in your knowledge.”

Collaboration with Saudi Arabia
Ricciardone’s visit to Jeddah and Riyadh is the first in his new capacity as AUC president. He is set to run meetings at the Education Ministry to explore the potential of collaborating at an educational level.
The AUC wants to collaborate with Saudi universities as well as lower schools. “The Kingdom has a vision, you have a reformist minister and the resources,” he said.
“Even in a time of budget restraint, the Kingdom is allocating recourses to education. If we can partner, we might be able to do great things together.”
He added: “You have energy now in the Kingdom. It’s remarkable and getting attention. You have energy in the Arab world. There’s a youthful energy here yet to find its expression, in business, art, science, and it’s finding its way. The AUC is part of it.”
He said the institution connects Egypt and the US, and aims to encourage internationals who are afraid of going to Egypt after the revolution to study there. Last year, 52 students from the Gulf enrolled, 21 of them Saudi.
“Historically, we opened the doors to young Egyptians, Palestinians and people from the Gulf,” Ricciardone said.
“We helped open the world to Egyptians and Arabs from the region by teaching in English and applying inquiry-based education and research. We (also) serve as a global university to bring Westerners to the East.
“It’s not always easy, especially now. There are bigots in the West and the East who want to build walls and paint each other as fanatics and murderers. Sadly, they’re having some success and they’re causing fear.”

Cairo then and now
Ricciardone first encountered the AUC as a tourist in 1977. He was a young schoolteacher in Iran. In the 1980s, he came back as a diplomat, met some of the professors and deepened his knowledge of the AUC.
In 2008 there were 681 Americans, accounting for about 15 percent of students. Now there are only 80 Americans.
“The revolution made people afraid to come to Egypt, but I think they’re wrongly afraid. A big part of my challenge as president, and our challenge as a faculty, is to bring back Americans to faculty. We used to have 45 percent American faculty members, now they’re about 30 percent,” he said.
“I want to bring more international students, more Saudis, more from the Gulf, more from Egypt. I want to re-internationalize, re-globalize the AUC.”
He said the US government approving the Fulbright scholarship program and other US study programs would signal to American academia that it is good to go back to Egypt and the Arab world, and “that the Arab world is welcoming” to Americans.
“American globalized audiences are concerned about America’s place in the world, and want to do something about it. The answer is come study and learn the true story about Islam and Muslims. Come learn Arabic in the Middle East, and have Middle Easterners say who they are and what their dreams are for the future,” he said.
“Don’t allow Daesh to hijack the personality and presentation of the Arab world. (They are) criminals. People in the Middle East know it.”
Today, AUC is home to 6,559 students — 95 percent of them Egyptian.

Main category: 

King Salman’s efforts to unite Muslim world praised at Pakistan conference

Author: 
Arab News
Thu, 2017-01-26
ID: 
1485376433072641500

ISLAMABAD: King Salman’s efforts to unite the Muslim world and Saudi Arabia’s role in the fight against terrorism have been praised at a conference in Pakistan held this week.
The international “Centrist Rhetoric and Community Security” conference, organized by the Muslim World League (MWL), called for the development of moderate rhetoric and to boost the fight against the currents of extremism.
A statement praised the effort by King Salman, as well as that of Saudi Arabia’s crown prince and deputy crown prince, to unite Islamic countries to achieve security, peace and stability, and to highlight moderation in the face of extremism and terrorism.
Participants at the conference expressed their gratitude and appreciation of Saudi Arabia over its formation of an Islamic military alliance to fight terrorism.
They called upon scholars and preachers, professors, educators and media to exert collective efforts to expose extremists’ fabrications and to reveal their false arguments.
The final declaration of the conference adopted a call made by the MWL to cooperate with official and popular institutions in Pakistan over joint programs aimed at correcting misconceptions about religion.
It also adopted a call for cooperation between the MWL and educational and social institutions and associations in Pakistan to help Muslims address challenges of poverty, disease and ignorance and to provide development projects.

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